2021-2022 Courses

Schedule21-22 – PDF for viewing on your phone or printing

Classes in RED currently have waiting lists.

Tuesday Course Offerings

Note that the majority of classes offered will meet two days per week (both Tues. and Thurs.)

8:30-9:25World LitPsychologyApplied MathMarine BiologyTrig/Pre-CalcMusic Appre.
9:30-10:25American LiteratureWorld HistoryPublic SpeakingEnvironmental SciGeometrySpanish I
10:30-11:25Short StoryChemistryUS HistoryBiologyAlgebra ISpanish II
11:30-11:55LunchLunchLunchLunchLunchLunch
12:00-12:55ComputersStudy SkillsGov/EconAnatomyAlgebra IIUS Parks & Lands
1:00-1:55Spanish IFilm StudiesCreative WritingGerman I & IIPhysicsASL I & II

Thursday Course Offerings

8:30-9:25Composition IPsychologyApplied MathMarine BiologyTrig/Pre-Calc
9:30-10:25Composition IIWorld HistoryJournalism I & IIEnvironmental SciGeometrySpanish I
10:30-11:25Short StoryChemistryUS HistoryBiologyAlgebra ISpanish II
11:30-11:55LunchLunchLunchLunchLunchLunch
12:00-12:55ResearchHealthGov/EconAnatomyAlgebra IIPhotography
1:00-1:55Spanish ICriminal JusticeMovies as LitGerman I + IIPhysicsComputers

Schedule21-22 – PDF for viewing on your phone or printing

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

~English/Language Arts~

American Literature (Honors option)

Focusing on American authors from Nathaniel Hawthorne to Ray Bradbury, the American Literature course will cover important literature as well as the historical importance of the time period in which the literature is set or written. Class time will be spent discussing important themes and literary elements and making connections between the literature and the real world.  We will cover important themes of friendship, honesty, forgiveness, prejudice, war, and more. Complete novels, plays, short stories, and poetry are included in this course, and tests and projects will be assigned throughout the year. Honors option available.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Tuesday
Instructor: Ginger Lockamy
Cost: $130/semester
Recommended credits: 0.5
Reading List: Native American short stories, Early American poetry, The Scarlet Letter, The Crucible, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Up From Slavery, Shane, To Kill a Mockingbird, Farewell to Manzanar, Code Talker, Fahrenheit 451

Composition I – waitlist

The focus of this composition course will be on the four modes of writing – narration, description, persuasion, and exposition. We will focus on content and structure and cover some general grammar skills. Writing assignments vary in length and format, but we will finish the course with a focus on the five-paragraph essay.  This course is geared toward students who want to gain more confidence in their writing and who need to spend some time building a foundation for advanced composition.  The assignments are a great mix of creative pieces and academic ones, all with a specific purpose. 
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Thursday
Instructor: Ginger Lockamy
Cost: $140/semester
Recommended credits: 0.5
Required Materials: None. Teacher-created materials will be supplied.

Composition II

The focus of this course will be expository writing, and development of a strong essay will be our focus. Students will write comparison/contrast essays, critical analyses, persuasive letters, quotation responses, and more. This course is geared toward students who have been exposed to formal essay writing and who are ready to hone their advanced writing skills such as using transitions, improving word choice, writing clearly and concisely, and employing a variety of sentence structures.  Composition I is not a prerequisite of Composition II, but any students who have not taken Composition I will be asked to submit a writing sample to assess readiness.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Thursday
Instructor: Ginger Lockamy
Cost: $140/semester
Recommended credits: 0.5
Required Materials: None. Teacher-created materials will be supplied.

Creative Writing

Creative Writing is a course designed to bring your stories to life, by teaching how to write engaging dialogue, build scenes, ramp up conflicts, create empathetic protagonists, select points of view, describe settings, hook readers, critique themselves, and more. We will also examine and practice the writing process including pre-writing, planning, drafting, revising, and editing. Designed for writers of all levels. Several works of literature will be used in the course.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Tuesday
Instructor:  Wendy Marus
Cost: $185/semester
Recommended credits: 1.0
Required Materials: Writing Fiction by Sharron Watson and Last Book In The Universe by Rodman Philbrick

Journalism I

The students will study the basic principles of print, media broadcasting, and formatting a yearbook. They will learn investigative skills, responsible reporting, and journalistic writing techniques as they read, respond to, and write their own news and feature articles, also learning components of computer graphic design as they format and produce a Compass Prep newsletter and yearbook. We will learn about broadcast media as they write, film, and edit news announcements that will broadcast to the students of Compass Prep.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Thursday
Instructor: Wendy Marus
Cost: $165/semester (includes copy fees, supplies, and computer subscription access)
Recommended credits: 1.0
Required Materials: Students will need a computer in class.

Journalism II

Journalism II is a more in-depth continuation of all the components of Journalism I. Students will engage in leadership positions as editors and staff managers, allowing them to experience leadership roles in a classroom environment.  As leaders, they may set deadlines, edit peers’ work, and determine the content. They will write articles and help with the writing and production of media and announcements. They will be editors and staff of the yearbook, helping to make decisions on the content and assign pages for their peers.  Prerequisite:  Journalism I
Min/max: 1/4 students
Days: Thursday
Instructor: Wendy Marus
Cost: $165/semester (includes copy fees, supplies, and computer subscription access)
Recommended credits: 1.0
Materials: Students will need a computer in class.

Movies as Literature (Honors option)

Movies as Literature uses classic films as material to be used for literary analysis in this full-year English course for high school students.  Reading, understanding, discussing, and analyzing literature is a fundamental component of high school learning. Students need to tackle challenging works of literature, build critical thinking skills, practice articulating what they observe, and step into a new level of maturity regarding books. For teens who love to read, that’s a fairly natural progression. For teens who don’t really care about reading, that’s a real challenge. For teens who truly struggle with reading, it may be overwhelmingly difficult. Developing this more mature way of thinking about literature is important for ALL students, though, and movies can help make that development possible if we make good use of them.  Academically, students will develop and reinforce: 1) oral and written communication skills; 2) critical thinking skills; 3) an ability to write analytical essays and film critiques; 4) an ability to compare and contrast novels and stories to their film adaptations, and 6) the habit of viewing moving images critically rather than passively. In addition, students examine how films often reflect the culture and times in which they are made, and conversely, how motion pictures sometimes help shape attitudes and values in society.  Honors option available.
Min/Max: 6/14
Days: Thursdays
Instructor:  Wendy Marus
Cost: $185/semester (Honors option available/Additional $50 per semester)
Recommended credits: 1.0
Required Materials: Movies as Literature Student Workbook; Movies titles your student will need to have access to watch throughout the year (Make sure to refer to the student book for the correct version of the movies.): Shane, Friendly Persuasion, The Music Man, E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial, Emma, The Philadelphia Story, The Journey of August King, To Kill a Mockingbird, A Raisin in the Sun, Raiders of the Lost Ark, A Man for All Seasons, Chariots of Fire

The Short Story (Honors option) – waitlist

Longer and more prosaic than poetry, but shorter and more “poetic” than most novels, the short story has evolved into one of the most powerful literary genres. During this course, a variety of activities will be used to read, write, and evaluate various kinds of short literary works including mystery, western, comedy, horror, gothic, romance, non-fiction, foreign, fable, and fairy tale. A wide variety of instructional strategies will be utilized including lecturing, informal and formal test evaluations, entire class and small group discussions and presentations, independent reading and writing assignments, and multi-media presentations. Students will read short stories with fluency, accuracy, comprehension and appropriate expression; identify and analyze the elements of short stories, which apply to longer works of fiction as well; and analyze the development of theme, tone, and literary devices. Fun projects will allow students to deepen their knowledge of the short story and share their creativity. Writing assignments will include both analysis of the literature and creative writing. This course will allow us to study some of the world’s greatest authors without spending weeks delving into novels.  Some authors we will cover include Aesop, Edgar Allan Poe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Guy de Maupassant, Charles Dickens, Anton Chekhov, O. Henry, Ray Bradbury, Mark Twain, Agatha Christie, and more. Literature and composition will be incorporated for a complete English course.
Min/Max: 6/14
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Ginger Lockamy
Cost: $225/semester
Recommended credits: 1.0 (0.5 literature/0.5 composition)
Required materials: A copy fee will be charged for a bound, printed copy of the stories we will be reading.

World Literature (Honors option) – waitlist

We will begin in Greece with Homer’s Odyssey, travel to England for some Shakespeare, and then take off around the world with literature selections from around the globe. Along our journey, we will discuss important themes of war, the Holocaust, friendship, truth, family relationships, and more. Students will prepare for weekly discussions by reading assigned chapters. Our class time will focus on identifying literary elements (symbolism, character, conflict, etc.) and their importance to the work, as well as discussing issues raised by the literature.  Honors option available.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Tuesday
Instructor: Ginger Lockamy
Cost: $130/semester
Recommended credits: 0.5
Reading List: Mythology, The Odyssey, The Trumpeter of Krakow, Romeo & Juliet, A Single Shard, Around the World in 80 Days, Cry the Beloved Country, Night, Children of the River, The Giver

~Science~

Advanced Biology: Human Anatomy & Physiology

With an emphasis on connecting creation to the Creator, this is a fully revised Advanced Biology (Human Anatomy) curriculum and is intended for those who have successfully completed high school biology. Sixteen modules cover human anatomy and physiology, starting with a review of cell structure, protein synthesis, and mitosis, then explore the skeletal, nervous, endocrine, lymphatic, digestive, respiratory, and reproductive systems. Student text includes study questions, laboratory exercises, and illustrated module study guides.  References to coloring exercises from the Kaplan Anatomy Coloring Book (#000258) are incorporated.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Joy Aldridge
Cost: $225/semester + $25 lab fee each semester
Recommended credits: 1.0
Required Materials: Exploring Creation with Advanced Biology: The Human Body 2nd ed. Text and Student workbook, Kaplan Anatomy Coloring book.

Biology w/ Lab – waitlist

Biology class with lab will be a hands-on class environment with labs using the microscope, observations and dissections.  In addition to covering topics in the textbook, such as cells, the study of life processes; the different Kingdoms; DNA; Genetics; Ecology; and how to properly use a microscope and stain specimens, the course will also bring in up-to-date biology topics and focus on developing the scientific method. Grading will be based on online module tests, class participation, projects, and lab reports.  We will follow a plan of study based on the Apologia Biology curriculum and will use an additional experiment book.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Joy Aldridge
Cost: $220/semester + $20 lab fee each semester
Recommended Credits: 1.0
Required Materials: Exploring Creation with Biology, 2nd edition; Illustrated Guide to Home Biology Experiments by Robert and Barbara Thompson; box of gloves; goggles; and composition lab notebook.

Chemistry w/ Lab (Honors option) – waitlist

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a general overview of chemistry and the science at work on the molecular level. This is an exciting field of study, and we will relate it to many other science disciplines, the world around us, and our daily lives. Topics covered will include: a review of the basic concepts of matter; atomic theory; the periodic table of elements; chemical bonding; molecular structure; binomial nomenclature; chemical equations and solutions; thermochemistry; acids and bases; oxidation and reduction reactions, and an introduction to organic chemistry. We will also cover: technical writing, lab documentation, data presentation, lab reports, ethics in science, and related careers. Homework will be required to successfully complete this course of study. Students should expect to work daily so that they do not fall behind. Labs will be completed in class, and instructor will provide the materials. Tests and quizzes will be graded by the instructor; feedback will be provided. Honors option available. Prerequisite: Algebra 1
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Chloe E. Walker
Cost: $210/semester + $25 materials & lab fee each semester
Recommended credits: 1.0
Required Materials: Apologia: Exploring Creation with Chemistry, 3rd Ed; Student Notebook; 3-ring binder; chemistry safety goggles (not safety glasses); disposable gloves (nitrile or latex); a calculator; supplemental course materials will be provided by the instructor (online or in class).

Environmental Science w/ Lab (AP Option) – waitlist

The course will include lecture, discussion, research, data analysis, and creative problem solving. Students will be expected to attend class, participate in field work, conduct lab investigations and research, and to complete weekly homework assignments related to course material. Topics covered by the course include: The Earth and its geology, oceanography, basic chemistry, hydrologic cycle, pollution, population, agriculture, natural resources, sustainability, environmental law, environmental activism, water and air purification, human impact, global connections, epidemiology, industrial hygiene and technology. This is a dynamic course where we will talk about everything from national parks to the great Pacific garbage patch. Environmental science is a great way to experience multiple science disciplines working together.  AP option: The AP Environmental Science course is designed to prepare students for the College Board AP Environmental Science Exam. In addition to the BARRON’s workbook, additional assignments and five practice exams will be completed to prepare students for the exam in May 2022. The student AP prep book will be provided by the instructor, with a study schedule after the AP course fees have been paid. Each AP student will receive his own preparation materials.
Min/Max: 6/12 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Chloe E. Walker
Cost: $200/semester + $25 lab fee each semester AP COST: additional $120/Semester (materials provided)
Recommended credits: 1.0
Required Materials: Environmental Science: A Global Concern; 3-ring binder; access to internet; use of a computer with word processing and presentation software; calculator.

Marine Biology w/ Lab

This course is designed as a second year life science course for high schoolers who already have an understanding of biology.  Students will learn about the physical structure and chemistry of the ocean, the diversity of ocean life, marine ecology, and the scope and impact of human interactions with the oceans. Laboratory activities reinforce concepts and principles presented. Dissections and observations will include, but will not be limited to microscopic plankton observation, bio-luminescence, coral, sponge, sea-star, clam, perch and dogfish shark. The student will be required to keep labs in the student notebook, read assigned pages, work through questions and study guides in the text at home, and follow directions through Canvas. Students will be assessed in a variety of formats including standard Canvas tests, labs, essays, projects, and participation. Two field trips are planned but not mandatory (approx. cost – $10 to pay at the time of trip) will be planned during the year and will need drivers.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Joy Aldridge
Cost: $220/semester + $20 lab fee each semester
Recommended Credits: 1.0
Required materials: Apologia Exploring Creation with Marine Biology (2nd ed) and Student Notebook (2nd ed). Apologia Exploring Creation with Marine Biology (1st edition) is acceptable with a few modifications.

Physics w/ Lab (Honors option)

This course will incorporate class demonstrations and hands-on activities, as well as lectures, to help students understand their world in the context of Newtonian physics. The emphasis of this course will be placed on physics concepts, although some Algebra 1 level math will be applied. The first semester will focus on topics of forces and motion, including momentum and energy. Second semester will cover topics such as waves and optics, electricity, and magnetism. Graded work will consist of homework, tests, and lab activities with at least one written lab report. Homework and textbook reading outside of class will be expected. Honors option available. Prerequisite: A grade of B or higher in Algebra I is a recommended.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Cheryl Johnson
Cost: $225/semester
Recommended credits: 1.0
Materials: Exploring Creation with Physics (2nd Edition), by Dr. Jay L. Wile (recommended, not required), 1” 3-ring binder with 3 divisions, scientific or graphing calculator, centimeter ruler, and protractor.

~Math~

Algebra I (Honors option)

This course will lay the foundation for higher level math to come.  We will cover concepts such as distributing and combining like terms, order of operations, solving one and multi-step equations and inequalities, solving and graphing systems, and working with exponents.  Quizzes and tests will be given and graded by the tutor.  Homework will be graded by the student or parent.  An honors option is available.
Min/Max: 7/12 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Wendy Lockhart
Cost: $225/semester
Recommended Credits:  1.0
Required Materials: Prentice Hall Algebra I Student Edition (ISBN: 9780131657083) and Algebra I Solutions Guide (ISBN: 9780201861006).  Students must have daily access to a computer and printer.

Algebra II (Honors option) – waitlist

This second-year algebra course will develop deeper understanding of mathematical concepts learned in prior courses, such as factoring, linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, and working with rational expressions and equations.  We will also dive into new concepts like logarithms, matrices, conic sections, and trigonometry.  Quizzes and tests will be given and graded by the tutor.  Homework will be graded by the student or parent.  An honors option is available. Prerequisite:  A grade of C or better in Algebra 1 is recommended for success in this class.
Min/Max: 7/12 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor:  Wendy Lockhart
Cost: $225/semester
Recommended Credits:  1.0
Required Materials: McDougall Littell Algebra 2 2004 ed by Bob Larson (ISBN: 0-618-25020-4); McDougal Littell Worked Out Solution Key Algebra 2 2001 ed (ISBN: 0-618-02024-1); McDougall Littel Practice Workbook, Algebra 2  (ISBN:  0-618-73696-4). Students must have daily access to a computer and printer.

Applied Mathematics/Personal Finance

Bridge the gap between just learning mathematical procedures and using them in everyday situations with the practical exercises of Applied Mathematics. This course covers concepts such as buying, insuring, and maintaining a car; understanding social security tax; creating and balancing a budget; renting a home; buying food and clothing; completing tax forms; and affording leisure time.  These principles will give the student sound, Biblical views for managing his own money. Students will use the model problems and practice exercises to understand the value of money and how to use it wisely.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Wendy Marus
Cost: $225 per semester
Recommended credits: 1.0
Required Material:Abeka Consumer Math in Christian Perspective (2nd ed.) and Foundations in Personal Finance by Dave Ramsey, Homeschool Student Text (New Ed.)

Geometry (Honors option)

Students will learn Euclidean geometry through the application of fundamental theorems and postulates.  We will study topics such as measurement and construction, coordinate geometry, relationships between parallel and perpendicular lines and their intercepted angles, congruent and similar triangles, area and volume formulas, ratios and proportions, special properties of segments and lines in triangles, circles and polygons, and basic trigonometry. Geometry is heavy on vocabulary and concepts will build on one another throughout the course.  An honors option is available.  Quizzes and tests will be given and graded by the tutor.  Homework will be graded by the student or parent. Prerequisite:  A grade of a C or better in Algebra 1 is recommended for success in this class.
Min/Max: 7/12 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor:  Wendy Lockhart
Cost:  $225 per semester
Recommended Credits:  1.0
Required Materials: Exact editions listed: Glencoe Geometry 2001(ISBN: 0-07-822880-8), Glencoe Geometry Practice Workbook (ISBN: 0-02-825322-1), Glencoe Geometry Answer Key (ISBN: 0-07-822884-0) – provided by the instructor for a fee, scientific calculator (does not have to be a graphing calculator). Students must have daily access to a computer and printer.

Pre-Calculus (Honors option)

This is a rigorous course which will deepen the student’s understanding of Algebra and Geometry including working with all types of functions:  linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, and polynomial functions.  Advanced topics for students will include emphasis on the unit circle, vectors, and polar coordinates.  This class will prepare students for college level mathematics or AP Calculus AB/BC at the high school level.   Quizzes and tests will be given and graded by the tutor.  Homework will be graded by the student or parent.  An honors option is available. Prerequisite:  A grade of C or better in Algebra 2 is highly recommended for success in this class.
Min/Max:  7/12 students
Days:  Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor:  Wendy Lockhart
Cost:  $225 per semester
Recommended credits:  1.0
Required Materials: PreCaclulus With Limits, Ron Larson, 7th Edition; Complete Solutions Guide, Dianna Zook HERE or HERE, and graphing calculator (TI-83, TI-84, TI-84 Plus, Silver Edition, or CE).  Students must have access to a computer and working printer daily.

Foreign Language

American Sign Language I – waitlist

ASL 1 will cover the basics of ASL, Deaf culture and history, and the foundations of ASL grammar.  We will learn how to introduce ourselves; discuss personal information; and talk about our surroundings, our families, where we live, and our activities.   We will also begin to learn about Deaf culture and Deaf history with an emphasis on influential Deaf people.  There will be a couple of research projects and lots of “hands on” practice in class.  We will also cover some grammatical principles such as use of space, handshape, movement, and non-manual markers.  By the end of the semester everyone should be able to have a simple conversation in ASL and be familiar with the Deaf community.   The class will be mostly voice off and will involve a lot of role play and practice with the weekly vocabulary, so participation is important.  There will be a couple of projects that will also be required, as well as a some homework assignments involving the DVD that comes with the student workbook.
Min/Max: 4/12 students
Days: Tuesday
Instructor: Jessica Shaeffer
Cost: $165/semester
Recommended credits: 1.0
Required materials: Signing Naturally Student Workbook Volume 1: DVD edition, ISBN: 0915035200

American Sign Language II – waitlist

ASL 2 will build on the foundations developed in ASL 1. We will continue working in the same book and delve deeper into the intricacies of grammar, facial expression, and handshape that are unique to ASL.  We will also continue to learn about Deaf culture and Deaf history.  By the end of the course the students will be able to have a fairly in-depth conversation in ASL.  There will also be a couple of research projects and presentations that are required.
Min/Max: 4/12 students
Days: Tuesday
Instructor: Jessica Shaeffer
Cost: $165/ semester
Recommended credits: 1.0
Required materials: Signing Naturally Student Workbook Volume 1: DVD edition, ISBN: 0915035200

German I

In beginning conversational German, students will learn grammar and vocabulary necessary to communicate in various situations.  This will include but is not limited to: alphabet, pronunciation, umlauts; grammar usage and rules in present, past, present perfect, and future tenses; vocabulary (colors, numbers, greetings, objects, careers, verbs, animals, etc.); most things you will need to know for a great start in speaking German and learning about German people and culture.  Also, scripture memorization (John 3:16) in German.
Min/Max: 4/14 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Joy Aldridge
Cost: $220/semester
Recommended Credits: 1.0
Required materials: German DeMystified 3rd ed (2nd ed ok), Ferien in Frankfurt, a notebook, and another digital book and audio (TBA).

German II

A review of the first year of German, increased vocabulary, reading and writing short stories, subjunctive mood, modal verbs, adverbs, comparisons, idioms, genitive case, passive voice, past perfect, imperatives, and more adjectives. The goal will be to become more fluent through speaking and the written word and to study the culture and lifestyle of Germans.  Scripture memorization in German.
Min/Max: 4/14 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Joy Aldridge
Cost: $225/semester
Recommended Credits: 1.0
Required Materials: German DeMystified 3rd ed (2nd ed ok), 100 German Short Stories, Jobsuche in München, and a notebook.

Spanish I – waitlist

An exciting introduction to the Spanish language and culture.  Beginning with the basics of the alphabet and frequently used salutations, students will dive into vocabulary, verbs, and the fundamentals of Spanish grammar (conjugating verbs in present and past tenses, subject/verb and subject/adjective agreement, object pronouns, etc.). Students will learn through written text, conversation, song, and media. Ideally by the end of the course, the students should be able to have a basic conversation about themselves, their families, and their hobbies.
Min/Max:  6/14 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday 9:30 or 1:00
Instructor: Señora Amanda Ghent
Cost: $225/semester
Recommended credits: 1.0
Required materials: Breaking the Spanish Barrier: Level 1

Spanish II

This second level course will continue to increase vocabulary, explore verb tenses (concentrating on past, progressive and perfect, and future), and engage in daily conversation to increase individual fluency. We will develop more complex sentences (verbal and written) using object pronouns, prepositions, and comparisons.  The course will dig deeper into Hispanic culture, the arts, and current events. Students will learn through written text, conversation, song, and media.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Señora Amanda Ghent
Cost: $225/semester
Recommended credits: 1.0
Required materials: Breaking the Spanish Barrier: Level 2

~Social Studies~

Criminal Justice (Honors option)

This comprehensive class will empower students to think critically about the U.S. criminal justice system. Opening with the fundamentals of criminal justice, this class focuses on crime and criminal law, before progressing through detailed analysis of the major components of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, the administration of justice, and corrections.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Thursday
Instructor: Cayla Revels
Cost: $185/semester
Recommended Credits: 1.0
Required Materials: Introduction to Criminal Justice 9th Edition by Robert M Bohm and Keith N Haley (Renting from Amazon recommended)

Government/Economics (Honors option) – waitlist

This course will cover the history and foundation of our principles and beliefs, branches of government, political parties, and electoral process, as well as the media’s effects on politics. The economic portion will cover the history of economics, investment cycles, velocity, business cycle, recessions, depressions, inflation, along with demand for money. This course will fulfill 0.5 credit hours of Economics and 0.5 credit hours of Government. (This course will offer an honors option; although it is not an AP course, it will help prepare students for the AP Exam.)
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Wendy Marus
Cost: $225/semester (Honors option available/Additional $50 per semester)
Recommended credits: 1.0 (.5 Government/0.5 Economics)
Required materials: Whatever Happened to Penny Candy? (An Uncle Eric Book) 7th Edition by Richard J. Maybury, The Money Mystery by Richard Maybury, Are you a Liberal, Conservative or Confused? by Richard Maybury, Magruder’s American Government by Prentice Hall.

Psychology (Honors option)

This is a fast-paced course that will teach psychological science through wit, humor, and the telling of poignant personal stories (individually identified in the text). Topics will include: Psychology’s History and Approaches, Research Methods: Thinking Critically With Psychological Science, Biological Bases of Behavior, Consciousness, Learning, Cognition, Motivation, Emotion, and Stress, Developmental Psychology, Personality, Abnormal Behavior, & Social Psychology. Honors option available.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Cayla Revels
Cost: $225/semester (Honors Option Available/Additional $25 per semester)
Recommended Credits: 1.0
Required Materials: Myers’ Psychology 3rd Edition by David G. Myers (Author), C.
Nathan DeWall (Author)

US History (Honors option)

The primary goal of this American History course is to learn and understand the history of the United States from the first Americans to the present day. Students should be able to identify the major themes in American History and explain their importance at each stage in the development of the United States. We will start at the beginning with the First Americans. We will continue our quest of exploring the Americas, Colonial America, The Spirit of Independence, and the American Revolution. After visiting those times, we will then head into The American Revolution, The Constitution, Growth and Expansion, Manifest Destiny, the Split between the North and South, and the Civil War. After the Civil War, we will dive into Westward Movement, the Industrial Age, The Rise to a World Power, WWI, the Great Depression, WWII, The Cold War, Civil Rights, Vietnam, and all the way to TODAY… (This course will offer an honors option. Although it is not an AP course it will help prepare your student for the AP US History Exam.)
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Wendy Marus
Cost: $225 per semester (Honors Option Available/Additional $50 per semester)
Recommended Credits: 1.0
Required materials: America: The Last Best Hope (Volume I and Volume II) by William J Bennett

World History (Honors option)

In this course students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; making historical comparisons; utilizing reasoning about contextualization, causation, and continuity and change over time; and developing historical arguments. For those interested in taking the AP exam, the course provides five themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; and development and transformation of social structures. Honors option available.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Cayla Revels
Cost: $225/semester (Honors option available/additional $25 per semester)
Recommended Credits: 1.0
Required Materials: World History 2016 Survey Edition by Prentice Hall

~Electives~

Computers – waitlist (12:00 Tues); new class 1:00 Thurs

This two-semester course covers keyboarding and Microsoft Office applications in the first semester, while blogging and graphic design will be covered in the second semester. Students will learn to effectively use Word, Excel, and Powerpoint through a series of projects. Basic computer hardware, internet safety, online research skills, and computer usage will be explored each week through presentations and fun activities. Keyboarding skills will be practiced through typing papers, and typing speed tests will be completed periodically. During the spring semester, students will learn blogging, Internet research skills, and graphic design. They will also complete a semester-long blogging project using the WordPress platform.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Tuesday (12:00) or Thursday (1:00)
Instructor: Ginger Lockamy
Cost: $185/semester
Recommended credits: 1.0
Required Materials: a working laptop is required for class

Film Studies – waitlist

Film studies is a course intended to familiarize students with the particulars of film history as well as to provide them with a chance to analyze film as a visual art form. This course should appeal to any and all students who are interested in learning the how a film is made and who love to watch movies and discuss them. Students will be immersed into the films from some of American cinema’s best filmmakers including: Walt Disney, Robert Altman, Steven Spielberg, Charlie Chaplin, Joel and Ethan Cohen, Blake Edwards, D.W. Griffith, James Cameron, Alfred Hitchcock, and more. Through these viewings, students will learn about and be able to analyze such concepts as: mise-en-scene, chiaroscuro, montage, color, sound, editing, cinematic structure, and more. Viewings will be supplemented with scholarly articles that focus on the filmmakers and the films they have produced, as well as various clips to analyze for concepts.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Tuesday
Instructor: Cayla Revels
Cost: $185/semester
Recommended Credits: 1.0
Required Materials: Most movies will be viewed outside of the classroom setting. Students must have ability to view movies in some capacity outside of class. This may include renting movies or paying to stream movies.

Health & Wellness

This class will provide students with a thorough understanding of all important physical, mental and social health issues. The students will pursue a moral basis for a healthy lifestyle based upon scriptural principles. Topics include: anatomy, body systems, food choices, exercise, disease, stress, emergencies, responsibility, and more.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Thursday
Instructor: Cayla Revels
Cost: $185/semester
Recommended Credits: 1.0
Required Materials: Exploring Creation with Health & Nutrition (textbook & student workbook) by Apologia

Music Appreciation

This course will cover four basic units: the elements of music (melody, rhythm, tempo, dynamics, scales), musical instruments (with hopes to play through many of them!), musical periods and history, and relating classical to current music trends.  Students will be able to analyze the composition of a piece of music and understand how different cultures use music in their lives.
Min/Max: 4/12 students
Days: Tuesday
Instructor: Amanda Ghent
Cost: $145/semester
Recommended credits: 0.5
Required materials: Alfred’s Essentials of Music Theory Book 1 and Book 2

Photography I – waitlist
Taught by a professional photographer, this year long course will begin with basic photography principles. It will progress to cover not only principles of photography but the technical aspect as well. We will also cover in this course post-production editing techniques used to bring your photographs to the next level.
Min/Max: 6/14
Days: Thursday
Instructor: Diane Payne
Cost: $150/semester
Recommended Credits: 1.0
Required materials: A camera that can utilizes all manual settings (DSLR) and Photoshop/Lightroom through Adobe Creative Cloud $9.99 monthly subscription

Photography II – canceled
If you have completed Photography I or are comfortable with the use of a digital SLR camera (in semi and manual mode), this course will allow you to expand your photographic competency and aesthetic sensibility while learning techniques to improve your work and build a greater understanding of advanced functions of the digital camera. The course stresses the development of a cohesive body of work, with the final goal a series of project- based photographs.  Prerequisite: Photography I or equivalent experience.
Min/Max: 6/14
Days: Thursday
Instructor: Diane Payne
Cost: $150/semester
Recommended Credits: 1.0
Required materials:A camera that utilizes all manual settings (DLSR) and Photoshop/Lightroom through Adobe Creative Cloud $9.99 monthly subscription.

Public Speaking – waitlist

Forbes magazine reports that nearly 70% of employed Americans say that presentation skills are critical to their job.  Yet experts say that approximately 77% of people experience anxiety about speaking in public. However, one can gain confidence and skill in the ability to speak publicly. In this course, students will learn how to organize and clearly present different types of information as they deliver impromptu, informative, narrative, and persuasive speeches to their classmates.  Students will be introduced to a variety of strategies to improve their memory as well as their confidence in public speaking.
Min/Max: 4/12
Days: Tuesday
Instructor: Ruthanna Marshall
Cost: $145/semester
Recommended credits: 0.5
Materials:  Teacher created materials and IEW Speech Boot Camp.  Students do not need to purchase a book, but they should have a three-ring binder just for Public Speaking class handouts.

Research

Knowing where to find trustworthy information and how to sift through the copious amounts of information on the Internet are necessary skills in our current climate. After completing this course, students will be ready to research topics for assigned research as well as for their own personal interests and knowledge. We will complete a variety of research projects throughout the year, and final products will include a brochure, a PowerPoint presentation, a display, and a medium-length research paper. Topics covered include choosing a topic, finding and using sources, using the Internet for research, note taking, outlining, drafting, editing and proofreading, publishing, and presenting. Students will be guided through the process step by step, and their final products will be great additions to their homeschool portfolios. Their presentations will give them practice speaking in front of their peers, and we will discuss how to make an interesting and insightful presentation in a variety of formats. We will cover the issue of plagiarism in depth, and students will be taught the process of correctly quoting and documenting their sources.
Min/Max: 6/14
Days: Thursday
Instructor: Ginger Lockamy
Cost: $175/semester
Recommended credits: 1.0
Required materials: a library card

Study Skills

This class teaches the most critical learning, organizing, and communication skills needed to be successful in school. Those skills include identifying students’ strengths & “SuperPowers” (according to Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences), setting goals, establishing priorities, managing time, organizing papers, speaking & listening effectively, working with teachers & peers, reading and understanding textbooks, taking notes, studying for tests, preparing for presentations, & tracking long-term goals.
Min/Max: 6/14 students
Days: Tuesday
Instructor: Cayla Revels
Cost: $185/semester
Recommended Credits: 1.0
Required Materials: Study Skills for College & Career Readiness

US Parks and Lands – waitlist

This elective is a social studies course and will encompass many areas of study: biology, environmental issues, geography, hydrology, geology, American history, politics, and current events. There will be quite a bit of discussion, and field trips where possible. We will use parts of Ken Burns’ docu-series “Our National Parks”, as well as an educational film produced by the U.S. Forestry Service for their 100th Anniversary entitled “The Greatest Good”. Our studies will look at national forests, national parks, and public lands. We will virtually visit our nations’ first national park (Yellowstone), Hoover Dam, our northern most lands in Alaska, Dry Tortugas, and everywhere in between. There will be homework, research, in-class projects, presentations and group projects. This course is interactive and engaging and also a great way to get to know America today and yesterday. The class time, course work, and research required are sufficient for a full credit for a high school elective. Students must be able to conduct research and submit original written work. No prerequisites.
Min/Max: 6/14
Days: Tuesday
Instructor: Chloe E. Walker
Cost: $175.00/semester + $10 materials fee
Recommended credits: 1.0
Required Materials: Prophets and Moguls, Rangers and Rogues, Bison and Bears, National Geographic Guide to National Parks of the United States, binder, paper, and writing implements. Students will need access to a camera, the internet, and a computer for homework, research, and projects. Not Required, but helpful: access to Disney+ and/or Amazon Video streaming services

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